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United Empire Loyalists, 1776-1784

Stamp Info

Name Value
Date of Issue July 1, 1934
Year 1934
Quantity 3,000,000
Denomination
10¢
Perforation or Dimension 11
Printer British American Bank Note Company.
Postal Administration Canada

Stamp Values/Prices (Beta Mode*)

Condition Name Avg Price
M-NH-VF Mint - Never Hinged - Very Fine
Mint - Never Hinged - Very Fine $40.00
M-NH-F Mint - Never Hinged - Fine
Mint - Never Hinged - Fine $24.00
M-NH-VG Mint - Never Hinged - Very Good
Mint - Never Hinged - Very Good $13.50
M-H-VF Mint - Hinged - Very Fine
Mint - Hinged - Very Fine $22.00
M-H-F Mint - Hinged - Fine
Mint - Hinged - Fine $13.00
M-H-VG Mint - Hinged - Very Good
Mint - Hinged - Very Good $9.00
M-NG-F Mint - No Gum - Fine
Mint - No Gum - Fine $7.50
U-VF Used - Very Fine
Used - Very Fine $6.80
U-F Used - Fine
Used - Fine $5.50
U-VG Used - Very Good
Used - Very Good $2.70
* Notes about these prices:
  • They are currently in beta mode, meaning that they should not be relied upon yet as a source of truth and could change frequently. Please notify CPS if you come across values that do not make sense.
  • They are not based on catalogue values but on current dealer and auction listings. The reason for this is that catalogues tend to over-value stamps.
  • They are average prices and might not be fully accurate. The actual value of your stamp may be slightly above or below the listed value, depending on the overall condition of your stamp.

About Stamp

In 1934 Canada commemorated the 150th anniversary of the completion of the United Empire Loyalists' immigration to Canada by issuing a special 10-cent postage stamp. Dominion Day, 1st July, 1934, was a suitable day for its release. At the close of the American War of Independence, many persons residing in the newly created United States of America remained loyal to the British Crown. They accordingly emigrated to Canada, commencing about the time of the evacuation of Boston by General Howe in March, 1776. The full tide of Loyalist immigration to Canada, however, did not take place until the evacuation of New York by the British in 1783. In the spring and summer of 1784 the great majority of the Loyalists within the limits of what is now the Province of Quebec moved to Upper Canada, now the Province of Ontario. Many settled along the Bay of Quinte and as far as Niagara. The influx into what is now New Brunswick resulted in the settlement of that province, and its separation from Nova Scotia.

Against a background of cross-hatchings, the central vignette shows a sculpture of a family group of father, mother, and two children dressed in the costumes of the Revolutionary period. The March Brothers of Teddington, England, created this work of art known as the United Empire Loyalists' Monument. Flanked by the trees of Prince's Square, it stands in front of the Court House in Hamilton, Ontario. On either side of the centre design are depicted the figures of Britannia and a Mohawk Indian, both surmounted by a crown and the Union Jack. Britannia is intended to personify the British Empire and to illustrate further the allegiance to the Empire of the Loyalists of British ancestry; the Mohawk Indian commemorates the part played in the Loyalist migrations by those Indians who elected to remain loyal to the British.

Creators

Based on a sculpture by Sydney March Designed by Robert Bruce McCracken

Original Artwork

Sydney March, "United Empire Loyalists"
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Reference

Patrick, Douglas and Mary Patrick. Canada's Postage Stamps. Toronto, McClelland and Stewart Limited, 1964, p. 69-70.

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